The History of Tea

Initially the soil of Sri Lanka was greatly known for the wonderful coffee it produced. But due to a plague which affected the entire coffee production of Sri Lanka, the producers destroyed every coffee plant, marking the end of a successful era of coffee plantation.

By this time though, tea had already begun attracting many individuals across the globe, for its revitalizing taste. Marking the beginning in China, tea has been used as a beverage since 3rd century AD, due to its highly recognisable medicinal values.

British became one of the tea lovers, who introduced the same to various cultures and countries reaching beyond the shores.

Marking the beginning in China, tea has been used as a beverage since 3rd century AD, due to its highly recognisable medicinal values. It did not reach the outside world as significantly until the 16th century,where tea was first introduced to Portuguese priests and merchants in China.

Ceylon Tea

In 1867 a scot named James Taylor introduced tea to the Ceylon soil, which was already a global winner, gradually transforming people to tea lovers. Well aware of the risks this experiment might lead to, James Taylor planted the first 19 acres of tea in Loolecondra Estate near Kandy, which registered the birth of the tea industry in Sri Lanka. Taylor experimented in tea manufacturing process, using his bungalow veranda as the factory and rolling leaves by hand. With his basic knowledge of tea cultivation, which he acquired in North India, he oxidized the leaves on clay stoves over charcoal fires, making the best of use of the resources he was limited to.The first batch of experimented tea was sold locally that became an immediate hit among the crowd.

With the encouragement from the positive feedback, James Taylor not only built a fully equipped factory by 1872 but also was able to make a significant mark upon the international market, by selling his first quality teas for a very good price at the London Auction.

Father of Ceylon Tea

From there onwards following the lead of James Taylor – the father of Ceylon Tea, many private sector companies, have taken the responsibility in satiating the global thirst, with finely processed Pure Ceylon Tea.